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Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust Announces Public Programming Schedule for Fall 2019

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The Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, which is currently presenting the acclaimed exhibition Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away., announces its fall roster of programs, including talks, theater, and commemorative events that explore Jewish history and life before, during, and after the Holocaust.

“The Museum is excited to announce our Fall public programs, which feature leading figures from a variety of disciplines speaking on crucial issues, both historical and contemporary,” said Jack Kliger, President & CEO of the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust.

Highlights include:

  • Prosecuting Hate Crimes: Charlottesville and Beyond, a panel discussion featuring Roberta Kaplan, Reverend Seth Wispelwey, Amy Spitalnick, Abraham H. Foxman, and moderated by CNN’s John Avlon
  • The development of identity with Holocaust survivor and educator Irene Butter in conversation with Andrew Solomon
  • The 81st Anniversary of Kristallnacht commemoration and special programs
  • A series on Art Crimes & Restoration
  • A lecture by distinguished Research Scholar Debórah Dwork on “The World of Auschwitz”
  • Holocaust survivors sharing their eyewitness accounts in the Museum’s monthly Stories Survive speaker series
  • The Sorceress (Di Kishefmakherin) operetta presented by National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene in a fully restored orchestration based, in part, on pre-Holocaust musical arrangements which were saved from destruction by the Nazis

For tickets, visit mjhnyc.org call 646.437.4202, or purchase in-person at the box office. The Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust is located at 36 Battery Place in Lower Manhattan.

In addition, the Tony Award-nominated and Drama Desk Award-winning National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene (NYTF), is in residence at the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust. NYTF’s season of “Spiritual Resistance,” which features artistic and theatrical works that explore themes of struggle against oppression, provides artistic expression concurrent with the Museum’s exhibition Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away. To see the roster of productions and events in addition to The Sorceress (Di Kishefmakherin), visit https://nytf.org/2019-2020-season/

MUSEUM SCHEDULE

Panel Discussion

Prosecuting Hate Crimes: Charlottesville and Beyond

Tuesday, September 10 | 7 PM

Join leading litigator Roberta Kaplan for an insiders’ discussion of the lawsuit representing those injured at the 2017 white nationalist rally in Charlottesville. Kaplan will be in conversation with plaintiff Reverend Seth Wispelwey and Integrity First for America Executive Director Amy Spitalnick. The three will provide an overview of the landmark case and discuss its impact on the broader fight against white nationalist violence in America. The program will be introduced by Abraham H. Foxman, Director of the Center for the Study of Anti-Semitism, and moderated by John Avlon, a Senior Political Analyst at CNN.

Co-presented with Integrity First for America

Free; advance reservations recommended at mjhnyc.org/events

Commemoration

September 11 Commemoration

Wednesday, September 11 | 10 AM–9 PM

In memory of those who were lost in the attacks at the World Trade Center site and in honor of the first responders, the Museum invites the public to come reflect and remember. Admission to MJH Highlights (Ordinary Treasures: Highlights from the Museum of Jewish Heritage Collection, the Pickman Keeping History Center, and Andy Goldsworthy’s contemplative Garden of Stones) is free for all.*

*A separate, paid ticket is required for the special exhibition Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away.

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Art Crimes & Restoration Series

Conversation

Hitler’s Hostage Art

Thursday, September 12 | 7 PM

Mary M. Lane, former chief European art reporter at The Wall Street Journal and the author of Hitler’s Last Hostages, will discuss how Hitler’s obsession with art fueled his vision of a purified Nazi state, and the fate of the artwork that was hidden, stolen, or destroyed to “cleanse” German culture. Lane, in conversation with Erin L. Thompson, America’s only full-time professor of art crime, will reveal the series of events leading up to 2013, when the German government confiscated roughly 1,300 works by Henri Matisse, George Grosz, Claude Monet, and other masters from the reclusive son of one of Hitler’s primary art dealers.

Free; advance reservations recommended at mjhnyc.org/events

Conversation

Recovering Nazi-Looted Art

Thursday, October 17 | 7 PM

Along with the genocide of millions of Jews, the Nazis fomented the most extensive theft in history of artworks from Jews and others as part of their program to eliminate all vestiges of Jewish culture and identity. Lawrence Kaye and Howard Spiegler and their colleagues at the law firm of Herrick, Feinstein have led the fight to recover these looted artworks. They will discuss several cases and provide an overview of the ethical and legal issues that are involved in recovering Nazi-looted art.

Free; advance reservations recommended at mjhnyc.org/events

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Conversation

Childhood and Selfhood: Irene Butter in Conversation with Andrew Solomon

Sunday, September 15 | 7 PM

“Enemies are people whose story you haven’t heard,” says Dr. Irene Hasenberg Butter, a survivor of two concentration camps who has dedicated her life to Holocaust education. Irene will share her story, in a conversation with Dr. Andrew Solomon, author of Far from the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity and The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression (winner of the 2001 National Book Award for Nonfiction). The two will share insights on selfhood, trauma, and navigating change gleaned from Butter’s childhood in Nazi-occupied Europe and Solomon’s research on the formation of self within different family frameworks.

Free; advance reservations recommended at mjhnyc.org/events

Film

Forgotten Soldier

Tuesday, September 17 | 7 PM

(2018, 69 mins., English, French, and Dutch) The film Forgotten Soldier tells the story of “Master of Bluffing” Salomon (“Sally”) Noach, a Dutch citizen who risked his life in Vichy, France to save hundreds from deportation to Auschwitz. The film follows Noach’s daughter, Lady Irene Hatter, as she goes in search of the truth behind her father’s story. This is the New York premiere of the film, which won festival awards in the UK, Canada, and United States. A discussion will follow with Lady Irene Hatter, her brother Jacques Hatter, and survivor Herman Veder who is featured in the film.

Free; advance reservations recommended at mjhnyc.org/events

Conversation

The Final Veil: An Artists’ Discussion

Wednesday, September 25| 2 PM

Join us for an artists’ discussion with the creators of The Final Veil—an upcoming multidisciplinary “movement opera” involving theater, dance, and song. Co-creators J.L. Marlor (composer) and Cassandra Rosebeetle (dancer) will share their discovery of the true story of Franceska Mann, a remarkable woman who resisted the Nazis in her final moments in the gas chambers at Auschwitz. They will discuss their artistic processes, and how the different mediums work together to bring this story of female resistance to life.

Free; advance reservations recommended at mjhnyc.org/events

Lecture

An Interfaith Story of Courage and Compassion

Tuesday, October 29 |2 PM

Storyteller Marty Brounstein, author of Two Among the Righteous Few: A Story of Courage in the Holocaust, brings a true interfaith story about a Christian couple in the Netherlands named Frans and Mien Wijnakker who, despite much risk and danger, saved the lives of over two dozen Jews during World War II. Brounstein’s meaningful personal connection to this story will be revealed through the story.

Free; advance reservations recommended at mjhnyc.org/events

Lecture

Snapshots from a Lost World

Thursday, November 7 | 7 PM

In 1986, during a tour of Auschwitz, Ann Weiss discovered a storage facility and came across an archive of 2,400 personal photographs, which had been confiscated from Jewish deportees. In this lecture and presentation, Dr. Weiss, author of The Last Album: Eyes from the Ashes of Auschwitz-Birkenau, will share 200 of these unforgettable images—over 30 of which are currently on display in the Museum’s exhibition Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away.

Free; advance reservations recommended at mjhnyc.org/events

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81st Anniversary of Kristallnacht

In commemoration of the 81st anniversary of Kristallnacht, Museum admission to MJH Highlights and remembrance programs will be free for all from November 7–11. The schedule of events is as follows:

Commemoration

Kristallnacht Commemoration

Sunday, November 10 | 10 AM – 9 PM

In commemoration of the 81st anniversary of Kristallnacht, the Museum provides a public candlelighting area in the Anne & Bernard Spitzer Grand Foyer and free admission to MJH Highlights, which includes Ordinary Treasures: Highlights from the Museum of Jewish Heritage Collection, the Pickman Keeping History Center, and Andy Goldsworthy’s contemplative Garden of Stones. A separate, paid ticket is required for the special exhibition Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away.

Lecture

Kristallnacht History & Significance: Talk With Natalia Aleksiun

Monday, November 11 | 7 PM

Natalia Aleksiun, Associate Professor of Modern Jewish History at Touro’s Graduate School of Jewish Studies, will discuss the history leading up to Kristallnacht and the impact of Kristallnacht on the religious, economic, and social dynamics of Jews within Germany and Nazi-occupied territory.

Free; advance reservations recommended at mjhnyc.org/events

Speaker Series

Stories Survive: An Eyewitness Account of Kristallnacht

Monday, November 11 | 2 PM

On November 10, 1938, 10-year-old Ruth Zimbler and her brother Walter watched from their apartment as the largest synagogue in Vienna was destroyed. Hear Ruth’s first-person account of Kristallnacht.

Free; advance reservations recommended at mjhnyc.org/events

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Lecture

Dr. Yaffa Eliach Third Annual Memorial Lecture

Sunday, November 10 | 2 PM

Distinguished Research Scholar Debórah Dwork will present the third annual Dr. Yaffa Eliach Memorial Lecture, on “The World of Auschwitz.” Dwork is the visionary Founding Director of the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Clark University. Pathbreaking in her early oral recording of Holocaust survivors, Dwork weaves their narratives into the history she writes. Among her award-winning books, Auschwitz (co-authored with Robert Jan van Pelt) drew the critically important connection between industrial killing and a society that believed it was involved in constructive activity. Family members of Dr. Eliach’s will also speak about her pioneering research and her singular life. Dr. Eliach’s trailblazing Center for Holocaust Studies, Documentation and Research merged with the Museum of Jewish Heritage in 1990. Free; advance registration recommended at mjhnyc.org/eliachmemorial

Book Launch

Tehran Children with Author Mikhal Dekel

Wednesday, November 13 | 7 PM

Tehran Children is the true story of Polish-Jewish child refugees who escaped the Nazis and found refuge in Iran. Mikhal Dekel, the daughter of one of these children, spent eight years traveling five in countries and researching in twelve archives to write this account of Jewish refuge in Muslim lands. Blending memoir with historical research, Dekel reveals a new Holocaust narrative: “one whose central image is not the concentration camp or the secret hiding place in the attic, but something much more disjointed: the constant fleeing from place to place, the shifting of allegiances and identity.”

Free; advance reservations recommended at mjhnyc.org/events

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Speaker Series

STORIES SURVIVE

Sundays at 1 PM on September 8, October 6, November 10, December 1

At this monthly series, hear a Holocaust survivor, World War II veteran, or descendant of a survivor share their life story in their own words.

On Sunday, September 8, Rene David Alkalay will share his eyewitness account of the Holocaust. Alkalay was born in Croatia during the war. He was imprisoned as an infant and toddler from 1941–1943 in the Kraljavica concentration camp with his mother and grandparents.

Free; advance reservations recommended at mjhnyc.org/events

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National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene

The Sorceress (Di Kishefmakherin)

Previews December 1 – 5

Performances December 9 – 29, 2019

By Avrom Goldfaden | Directed by Motl Didner | Musical Direction by Zalmen Mlotek |

Choreographed by Merete Muenter

NYTF presents a fairytale-like story of a pure-hearted young woman who triumphs over her tormentors, a scheming stepmother and a wicked witch. This operetta by Avrom Goldfaden is one of the very earliest works of Yiddish theater and the first to be produced in America. The fully restored orchestrations are based, in part, on pre-Holocaust musical arrangements which were saved from destruction at the hands of the Nazis by the famed “Paper Brigade” of the YIVO in Vilna, who risked their lives to save thousands of unique documents and manuscripts. This fully-staged work is the culmination of a project which NYTF begin in 2017 to restore this classic.

In Yiddish with English and Russian subtitles.

Tickets available at nytf.org

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FAMILY PROGRAMS

New Families, New Traditions

Sundays at 10:30 AM on September 22, October 27, November 24, December 15

Join the musical group Yellow Sneaker and their puppet pals for entertaining programs that nurture family bonds and bridge connections to Jewish life and traditions. For ages infant to 4 years old and their grownups.

Free, drop-in

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GENERAL INFORMATION

HOURS

Sunday – Thursday 10 AM to 9 PM
Friday (April to October)10 AM to 5 PM

Friday (November to March) 10 AM to 3 PM

Last admission to Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away. is 2 hours before closing time. Last entrance to the rest of the Museum is 30 minutes prior to closing time.

The Museum is closed on Saturdays, Jewish holidays, and Thanksgiving.

ADDRESS

Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust

36 Battery Place, New York City

Neighborhood: Battery Park City in Lower Manhattan

mjhnyc.org

646.437.4202

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